Andrea Galvani © 2005, Death of an image #5
C-print mounted on aluminum dibond, wood white frame, 108 x 146 cm // 42.5 x 57.5 inches
Collection AGI, MART Museum, Rovereto, Italy. Courtesy the artist and Artericambi, Verona, Italy

Death of an image

When things become hot or very cold they change.
Sometimes it happens in such a radical way that it is no longer possible to recognize them. They change so much that, by just looking, there is nothing that would enable us to recognize their original molecular structure. At the same time, beyond 780 nm, the threshold of the visible spectrum, the human eye is plunged into darkness, a cosmic darkness in which the electromagnetic waves transmitted by objects are imperceptible.
Death of an Image is an attempt to cross a boundary, the desperate need to cancel something out in order to rebuild it.

Objects, placed within the area of the shot according to precise perspectival hierarchies, generate their own absence, exposing hiatuses in the landscape, cloaking it, transforming the subjects. They are physical subtractions repeated in space, calibrated violence that triggers a process of the image’s resurrection. They are precarious interventions, light superstructures that interfere, doubling the visual epicenter.


Andrea Galvani, Selfportrait for «Tema Celeste», n.120, March – April 2007, Gabrius Editore, Milan

Andrea Galvani © 2005, Brain #1 (study for a wall painting)
Black ink on paper, 70 x 100 cm // 27.6 x 39.4 inches
Graphic intervention on anatomical diagram by Korbian Brodman (1868-1918)

Andrea Galvani © 2006, Death of an image #9
C-print on aluminum dibond, wood white frame, 108 x 146 cm // 42.5 x 57.5 inches
Collection AGI, MART Museum, Rovereto, Italy. Courtesy the artist and Artericambi, Verona, Italy

Death of an image #5 and #9 (belongs to the namesake series 2005-2008), are the documentation of two actions produced respectively in an embankment nearby an industrial area of Cagliari in Sardinia and a shipyard in southern Corsica. The heads of two horses, training for military ceremony, have been physically covered by a soft and precarious structure; constructed by fine metal wire, foam rubber and balloons filled with helium gas. The subjects are then distorted, censored by the volume of objects and interrupted by a black or white visual pause. The animals appear and usher in a new transfigured form, portrayed in an almost primordial stage.In the entire series of Death of an Image, Andrea Galvani uses a barrage of objects, mirrors and reflections of light, smoke and the process of detonation, and has worked for several years on the landscape as subject, detracting portions, unfolding and altering the physical perception of the space. Suspended in remote and dilated time, the locations seem perturbed by the artist, having done mysterious physical experiments as violent actions that last for fractions of a second or on the contrary, structural interventions that have fragile properties, which are constructed through a very slow process. In the photographs of this series, the space seems expanded, deposited under the form of biological aggregations, strange formations of crystals or planetary explosions.

Andrea Galvani © 2005, Death of an image #2
C-print on aluminum dibond, wood white frame, 95 x 140 cm // 37.4 x 55 inches, unframed
Private collection, Berlin. Courtesy Artericambi, Verona, Italy

Andrea Galvani © 2006-2008, Death of an image #12
C-print mounted on aluminum dibond, 128 x 180 cm // 50.4 x 70.9 inches, framed
Courtesy of the artist and Meulensteen Gallery, New York

Andrea Galvani © 2005, Death of an image #4
C-print on aluminum dibond, wood white frame, 128 x 173 cm // 50.4 x 68 inches