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Andrea Galvani © The End [Action #1] Mart Museum_1.jpg

Andrea Galvani © The End [Action #1], 2013-2015
Synchronized multichannel video installation
16mm film transferred to HD, Architectural dimensions
Installation and performance view at the Mart Museum, Trento
Photo by Fernando Guerra

 

The End [Action #1]

Developed over two years of research conducted in the United States and Mexico, The End is a trilogy of exhibitions unfolding in multiple manifestations. The End [Action #1], an Art in General New Commission, is a site-specific, multichannel video installation documenting one collective action, an homage to the heliocentric model of our solar system championed by Galileo Galilei, father of modern astronomy. Over the course of months, Andrea Galvani coordinated with local cameramen to film the sunrise along the eastern coastline of five different Central American countries. On January 8th, the anniversary of Galileo’s death in 1642, the event was filmed in over 30 different locations simultaneously. Discrepancies between atmospheric conditions, the sensitivity of 16mm film technology, and the movements of each individual manifest as a prism of time and space. The architecture of The End [Action #1] was conceived as an ephemeral monument—pedestals of light designed to be used by seven vocalists whose voices activate and enliven the space at different times throughout the exhibition.

 

Andrea Galvani © The End [Action #1] Revolver Galería.jpg

Andrea Galvani © The End [Action #1], 2013-2015
Synchronized multichannel video installation
16mm film transferred to HD, Architectural dimensions
Installation and performance view at Revolver Galería, Buenos Aires
Photo by Fabián Cañás

Andrea Galvani © Study on Emission Spectra.jpg

Andrea Galvani © Study on Emission Spectra, 2015
Ink, graphic gradient, and black-and-white photographs
 on archival paper; black wood frame
70 x 100 cm / 27.6 x 39.4 inches

 

Andrea Galvani © Still Sequence from The End [Action #1].jpg

Andrea Galvani © Stills from The End [Action #1], 2013-2015
Synchronized multichannel video installation
16mm film transferred to HD
Architectural dimensions

 

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↑Andrea Galvani © Study on Uranographic Machine, 2015
↓Andrea Galvani © Studies on Cosmic Movement, 2015-2016
Ink drawings on archival paper, white wood frames
70 x 100 cm / 27.6 x 39.4 inches, each

 

Andrea Galvani © The End [Action #1] Art In General_1.jpg

Andrea Galvani © The End [Action #1], 2013-2016
Synchronized multichannel video installation
16mm film transferred to HD, Architectural dimensions
Installation view at Art in General, New York
Photo by Charles Benton

 

Andrea Galvani © The End [Action #1] Art In General_2.jpg

Andrea Galvani © The End [Action #1], 2013-2016
Synchronized multichannel video installation
16mm film transferred to HD, Architectural dimensions
Installation and performance view at Art in General, New York
Photo by Charles Benton

 

TEST WEBSITE Andrea Galvani © 2015, The End [Action #1]-3 copy.jpg

Andrea Galvani © The End [Action #1], 2013-2016
Synchronized multichannel video installation
16mm film transferred to HD, Architectural dimensions
Installation view at Art in General, New York
Photo by Charles Benton

 

DARKER_Andrea Galvani © The End [Action #1] Mart Museum_2.jpg

Andrea Galvani © The End [Action #1], 2013-2016
Synchronized multichannel video installation
16mm film transferred to HD, Architectural dimensions
Installation and performance view at the Mart Museum, Trento
Photo by Andrea Cracco

 

Geological time began with the first sunrise: a recurring event that represents the primordial chronography of our planet's movement around the Sun. We are part of this continuum for a brief moment, a single oscillation in the pendulum of cosmic existence. The End presents the opportunity to witness the sunrise ad infinitum. Juxtaposing a multiplicity of perspectives, the horizon is expanded into a unified visual field—subjective perception is transformed into a new singular vision. Galvani’s work seems to defy distinctions between visible and invisible, continuity and temporality. The End challenges the idea of boundaries as points of separation, instead suggesting points of contact. Boundaries change position, accumulate power, produce energy. They define topologies and conditions of differential equations in mathematics; they govern the laws of physics. Boundaries can be political, geographical, or psychological territories. Horizons are the perimeters of perception, both sensitive and cognitive. With The End, Galvani seeks to extend our experience of the horizon’s spatial and temporal limits, articulating their physical and conceptual elasticity.

 

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Andrea Galvani © The End [Action #1] Still #8, #13, #3, and #5, 2016
C-print diptychs mounted on aluminum dibond, gray wood frames
168 x 208 x 7 cm / 66 x 82 x 3 inches, each

 

Andrea Galvani © The End [Action #1] Black.jpg

Andrea Galvani © Still from The End [Action #1], 2013-2016
Synchronized multichannel video installation
16mm film transferred to HD, Architectural dimensions